ICANN wants to raise the .com price

ICANN wants to raise the price of .com domains. Here is a good article from namesilo. https://www.namecheap.com/blog/icann-allows-com-price-increases-gets-more-money/

You can send ICANN an email and join the discussion there on why they should not do this. Or at least not with so much every year.

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Domain names should not be a ‘for profit’ industry. Sadly, we have already started sliding down that slippery slope, so it is likely that there is no going back now. :frowning:

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Sadly there is no clean migration strategy like there would be if a hosting provider raised prices. They want money, it’s guaranteed money. That’s it.

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Or, you can simply choose another TLD. It’s not like we don’t have so many other options.

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Except not all TLD’s are interchangable.

Please define “interchangable”, what do you mean?

Some TLDs are preferred over others. Not all TLDs have the same weight professionally or globally.

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.com stands for commercial. Other than that… functionalities are the same.

On the other hand, I’d be willing to pay more if it ended up amounting to an attack on the people who do stuff like this: http://www.email.com

Comment is justifiable in your case, because you provide commercial services with email, so wishing that domain is understandable in your case. But hey, you already have mxroute.email.

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This isnt discussing functionalities. We were discussing PREFERENCES.

Then discussion becomes redundant, as preferences are subjective and based on individual taste. I can only wish you to enjoy your .com domain(s).

Seems Microsoft has bought Microsoft.sucks, maybe a new market strategy :wink:

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Your comment highlights and bolsters my point. Thank you.

No. My comment does not highlight your point. I comment about functionalities and meaning, you write about preferences. But… meah… I refuse to beat a dead horse.

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If " .COM makes up 73% of all gTLD domain names" and “40% of all domain names” (I have not verified these claims but I have no reasons to believe they aren’t accurate), then you can’t simply play it down to a matter of your preference: users’ preference (or better: habit) is to fill in “.com” if they’re unsure about the TLD of the domain they’re looking for. You may hate it, but that’s it. You may try to educate your audience… maybe, but only if you’re somewhat already established. People don’t like to change habits and be told what their preference should be (I’m still resisting the whole hostballs demise myself); also it won’t be nice to have a competing domain with a .com TLD anyway, even if you haven’t set up a “COMmercial” site. Competing “general purpose” gTLDs are somewhat looked with suspicion from some (most?) users (ex: .xyz), they aren’t “perceived” trustworthy even if technically nothing changes.
Exceptions do exist: specialized sites, regional sites, and “domain hacks” too. Domain hacks are another example of how the original “intended purpose and meaning” of a TLD doesn’t really matter. The current main widespread usage of .CO and .IO ccTLDs should make it pretty clear

I, for one, would welcome a 70% price increase if domain squatting and forever parked domains were going to be effectively purged and persecuted in the .com realm.

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It is the principle of it.

  1. ICANN is nonprofit + it is a monopoly
    What this means is, with the more .com domains registered, the price should go down instead of up. If it does go up, it should be very clear what they need the money for.
  2. There are 144mil .com domains registered atm. So the ICANN budget is huge as it is.
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"nonprofit"

Verisign has been pushing this for at least a year, it isn’t exactly coming out of the blue; and it all started with the US Dept. of Commerce lifting a price hike ban. Domainnamewire also points to a form prepared by the Internet Commerce Association but I believe more in a revoked Brexit than in a revoked price hike tbqhfam

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Spot on.

I tried using a .co domain for emails in the UK, it failed miserably.

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